Paul McCartney blames John Lennon for the Beatles split

He won’t let that happen.

Paul McCartney is insisting that it was bandmate and songwriting partner John Lennon who decided the Beatles “couldn’t make it work” in 1970 – and not them, as has been widely reported for five decades.

“I did not provoke partition. He was our Johnny,” McCartney reportedly told BBC Radio 4 in an interview broadcast on 24 October, when asked about his April 1970 comments announcing the end of the band’s long and winding road. .

“I’m not the person who instigated the split. Oh no, no, no,” he said according to a preview of the interview published in The Guardian. “John walked into a room one day and said ‘I’m leaving the Beatles.’ Is it provoking division or not?”

McCartney said that the group’s new manager, Alan Klein, advised him to keep quiet about the split as he negotiated deals on their behalf, but the now-79-year-old bassist grew impatient and spilled the beans – leaving him behind the band. The face of separation was made. .

Sir Paul McCarney revealed in a recent BBC interview that he thinks the real reason for the Beatles split is John Lennon.
Sir Paul McCarney revealed in a recent BBC interview that he thinks the real reason for the Beatles split is John Lennon.
SiriusXM. for Brian Bader/Getty Images

Reportedly, McCartney told the BBC, “I was fed up with hiding it.”

McCartney stated that Lennon’s newfound obsessions with wife Yoko Ono – such as the 1969 “Bed for Peace” in Montreal and Amsterdam – were inconsistent with the band continuing to write and record together.

Lennon, McCartney said, “wanted to get in a bag and lay in bed in Amsterdam for a week at peace. And you couldn’t argue with that.”

“The point of it was really that John was building a new life with Yoko,” he explained. “John always wanted to be isolated from society because, you know, he was raised by his Aunt Mimi, who was pretty oppressive, so he always wanted to let loose.”

According to Paul McCartney, John Lennon (right)'s obsession with his wife Yoko Ono (left) was incompatible with the band, which continued to write and record together.
According to Paul McCartney, John Lennon (right)’s obsession with his wife Yoko Ono (left) was incompatible with the band, which continued to write and record together.
Brenda Chase/News Producer
Paul McCartney said the group's new manager advised him to keep quiet about the split as he negotiated deals on his behalf.
Paul McCartney said the group’s new manager advised him to keep quiet about the split as he negotiated deals on his behalf.
Fox Photos / Getty Images

He said Lennon apparently called the decision to leave “quite thrilling” and “like a divorce.” At the same time, McCartney called John and Yoko “a great couple”.

“It was my band, it was my job, it was my life, so I wanted to keep it going,” McCartney said of his desire to keep the group together at the time. “I did not provoke partition. That our Johnny was coming in one day and saying ‘I’m leaving the group.'”

The BBC interview will air about a month before the premiere of director Peter Jackson’s upcoming documentary about the band’s final days, titled “Get Back”.

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